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Painting Process - Pt. 2

Here we wrap everything up and put the finishing touches on our mask. Every mask will require something different at this step. Some require the addition of hair, others may require resin teeth or horns to be attached, ect.

In our case, this piece will need a little hair, and some bandages.

 

Hair

The hair I use for this piece is called Mohair which I ordered from Ebay. Another source is the Woolery has an excellent selection of affordable high-quality Mohair.

The hair is pulled into short lengths and applied using Elaine’s Stretchy Fabric Glue. Because the glue dries flexible and almost clear, it’s perfect for attaching the hair to masks.

Bandages

I used cheese cloth for the bandages. First, I cut the cheesecloth into strips and double it up. Next, I brush on a liberal amount of Elaine’s Fabric Glue. Finally, I lay the bandages on the mask while good and wet. I brush more glue on top of the bandages, making sure that the glue is touching the surface of the latex. The glue sets up and dries quickly. I like to let it sit over night and then using a light brown paint wash, I airbrush some brown on to the bandages to give the old-age look.

 

Epoxy

Last, I use a small amount of 2-part 5 minute epoxy and seal up the eye and cover the teeth. This provides a really nice, strong gloss coat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cutting the Mask

The final step in the whole process is to cut the eye holes, breathing holes, and back of the head. Unfortunately, I don’t have pictures of the process. But, you’ll use a new Exacto blade for this. Do use a new one, you’ll get a nice, clean, professional edge to your mask. Be sure to wipe the blade clean, new blades have an oil coating, and oil will breakdown and rot the latex over time.

Each mask will be cut in a different area. I have outlined in red where this mask gets cut. The goal is to cut the eye holes to match where the wearer’s eyes will end up in the mask. Try to cut breathing holes in deeper areas of the mask, this will help conceal the holes. A straight cut up the back side of the skull is often necessary to allow the mask to slip over one’s head

 

 

Conclusion

I used cheese cloth for the bandages. First, I cut the cheesecloth into strips and double it up. Next, I brush on a liberal amount of Elaine’s Fabric Glue. Finally, I lay the bandages on the mask while good and wet. I brush more glue on top of the bandages, making sure that the glue is touching the surface of the latex. The glue sets up and dries quickly. I like to let it sit over night and then using a light brown paint wash, I airbrush some brown on to the bandages to give the old-age look.