How to use this guide

-Each chapter is broken down into two parts. The first part will cover the supplies needed. The second part will discuss the techniques involved.

-Almost all the images within the guide can be clicked to enlarge.

-This left column will be used to convey helpful quick tips and other useful information

Introduction

In 1994 I ordered the now classic VHS tape from Death Studios titled “How to Make Masks the Death Studios Way”. I remember receiving the tape and watching it dozens of times before working up the nerve to make my first mask. Having little or no experience with the many different mediums required to make a mask, I was very intimidated with the process. So much so, that it took me a full year before I decided to finally make my first mask. I was, and still am eternally grateful to Jeff Keim of Death Studios for being so willing to share his process and knowledge of mask making. Through the years, I was always surprised to find how open and willing most mask makers were with sharing their knowledge too. It is in this spirit of sharing that I have put this guide together. My hopes are that this might provide a glimpse into my own process of mask making, a process that is a combination of many other mask makers’ techniques and my own.

THE CLASSIC DEATH STUDIOS VHS

Goal

The goal of this guide is to provide a detailed look at the process that the Devils Workshop employs to create a monster mask from beginning to end.

It is important to note: while this is the process that I use, I make no claim that these are the best practices, the most efficient or best way to make a mask. They are simply the steps that work for me. Parts of my process have evolved dramatically through the years, and I’m quite sure that they will continue to evolve even further. I strongly recommend using all available resources if you plan to begin making masks for yourself. A detailed list of resources is available at the end of this guide, or by clicking here. I will attempt to be both thorough in my descriptions, but not overly wordy in my descriptions.

Thanks-
Pete Infelise